Pradipika (pronounced pra-DIP-i-kah) is a sanskrit word that means to illuminate or to shed light on, from the classic yoga text, The Hatha Yoga Pradipika, which teaches the principles of the physical and energetic practice of yoga.   Pradipika offers a space to practice heated power vinyasa, yoga basics, gentle yoga, and meditation.  Our teachers are committed to creating an environment that encourages precise and safe alignment, gentleness and acceptance during practice, as well as building strength and flexibility in the body.  Pradipika is a place for you to discover your own path to a wellness and radiance that comes from within.  


what is yoga?

The word yoga means "union" in Sanskrit, the language of ancient India where yoga originated.  We can think of the union occurring between the mind, body and spirit. What is commonly referred to as "yoga" can be more accurately described by the Sanskrit word asana, which refers to the practice of physical postures or poses.   Asana is only one of the eight "limbs" of yoga, the majority of which are more concerned with mental and spiritual well-being than physical activity. In the West, however, the words asana and yoga are often used interchangeably.

Alan Finger, ISHTA Yoga 

Many people think that yoga is just stretching.  But while stretching is certainly involved, yoga is really about creating balance in the body through developing both strength and flexibility.  This is done through the performance of poses or postures, each of which has specific physical benefits. The poses can be done quickly in succession, creating heat in the body through movement (vinyasa-style yoga) or more slowly to increase stamina and perfect the alignment of the pose. The poses are a constant, but the approach to them varies depending on the tradition in which the teacher has trained.

Baron Baptiste 

Baron Baptiste 

The amazing thing about yoga is that your practice is always evolving and changing, so it never gets boring.  Although the poses themselves do not change, your relationship to them will.  Anyone can start a yoga practice, even if you don't feel like you are very flexible or very strong. These things will improve the longer you practice.  Another great thing about thinking about "your practice" is that it encourages the noncompetitive spirit of yoga. One of the most difficult, but ultimately most liberating things about yoga is letting go of the ego and accepting that no one is better than anyone else.  Everyone is just doing their best on any given day.                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Source: About.com

10 reasons to do yoga

stress relief

The practice of yoga is well-demonstrated to reduce the physical effects of stress on the body. The body responds to stress through a fight-or-flight response, which is a combination of the sympathetic nervous system and hormonal pathways activating, releasing cortisol – the stress hormone – from the adrenal glands.  Cortisol is often used to measure the stress response. Yoga practice has been demonstrated to reduce the levels of cortisol. Most yoga classes end with savasana, a relaxation pose, which further reduces the experience of stress.

standing split boat

pain relief

Yoga can ease pain. Studies have shown that practicing yoga asanas (postures), meditation or a combination of the two, reduced pain for people with conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, auto-immune diseases and hypertension as well as arthritis, back and neck pain and other chronic conditions.

better breathing

Yoga includes breathing practices known as pranayama, which can be effective for reducing our stress response, improving lung function and encouraging relaxation.  Many pranayamas emphasize slowing down and deepening the breath, which activates the body’s parasympathetic system, or relaxation response. By changing our pattern of breathing, we can significantly affect our body’s experience of and response to stress. This may be one of the most profound lessons we can learn from our yoga practice.

flexibility

Yoga can improve flexibility and mobility and increase range of motion. Over time, the ligaments, tendons and muscles lengthen, increasing elasticity.

increased strength

Yoga asanas use every muscle in the body, increasing strength literally from head to toe. A regular yoga practice can also relieve muscular tension throughout the whole body.

eagle boat

weight management

While most of the evidence for the effects of yoga on weight loss is anecdotal or experiential, yoga teachers, students and practitioners across the country find that yoga helps to support weight loss. Many teachers specialize in yoga programs to promote weight management and find that even gentle yoga practices help support weight loss. People do not have to practice the most vigorous forms of yoga to lose weight. Yoga encourages development of a positive self-image, as more attention is paid to nutrition and the body as a whole. A study from the Journal of Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine found that regular yoga practice was associated with less age-related weight gain.  The lifestyle study of 15,500 adults in their 50’s covered 10 years of participants’ weight history, physical activity, medical history and diet.

improved circulation

Yoga helps to improve circulation by efficiently moving oxygenated blood to the body’s cells.

cardiovascular conditioning

Even a gentle yoga practice can provide cardiovascular benefits by lowering resting heart rate, increasing endurance and improving oxygen uptake during exercise.

hanuman boat

presence

Yoga connects us with the present moment. The more we practice, the more aware we become of our surroundings and the world around us. It opens the way to improved concentration, coordination, reaction time and memory.

inner peace

The meditative effects of a consistent yoga practice help many cultivate inner peace and calm.                                                                                                                                  

Source: Yoga Alliance